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Could villains clone themselves to take over the world?
1 month ago

Could villains clone themselves to take over the world?

If asked about clones, most people think of evil sci-fi characters. However, in real life, the word “clone” often has broader, far more positive applications. Just as office workers replicate …
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Do blind people have better hearing?
1 month ago

Do blind people have better hearing?

The sensation of sound occurs when the vibrations from sounds enter our ear and cause little hairlike structures – called hair cells – within our inner ear to move back …
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Gene editing protects pigs from killer virus
1 month ago

Gene editing protects pigs from killer virus

Researchers have used gene editing to successfully breed pigs that are resistant to a deadly virus.

Coronaviruses, highly contagious and widespread viruses known for their distinctive microscopic halos, are responsible …
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These 3D-printed parts ‘remember’ how we use them
1 month ago

These 3D-printed parts ‘remember’ how we use them

Researchers have developed 3D-printed devices that can track and store their own use—without batteries or electronics.

Cheap and easily customizable, 3D-printed devices are perfect for assistive technology, like prosthetics or …
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Lab-grown retinas reveal how the real things form
1 month ago

Lab-grown retinas reveal how the real things form

Biologists have grown human retina tissue from scratch to learn how the cells that let us see in colour are made.

The work may lay the groundwork for therapies for eye …
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Just like humans, more cats and dogs are living with chronic health conditions
1 month ago

Just like humans, more cats and dogs are living with chronic health conditions

About 15m people in England have a long-term health condition, such as diabetes, persistent pain or arthritis.

Living with this type of a health problem can have a huge impact on a …
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Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing shows proof-of-concept in treating disease before birth
1 month ago

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing shows proof-of-concept in treating disease before birth

For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before …
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Nanoparticles to treat snakebites
1 month ago

Nanoparticles to treat snakebites

Venomous snakebites affect 2.5 million people, and annually cause more than 100,000 deaths and leave 400,000 individuals with permanent physical and psychological trauma each year. Researchers reporting in PLOS …
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3D printing coral reefs can create new habitat – but it doesn’t tackle human destruction
1 month ago

3D printing coral reefs can create new habitat – but it doesn’t tackle human destruction

Coral reefs are vanishing from the world’s oceans. At least three quarters of these tropical marine habitats are severely threatened globally and in 2016 alone, the Great Barrier Reef lost up …
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Does the brain really feel no pain?
1 month ago

Does the brain really feel no pain?

The brain has no nociceptors – the nerves that detect damage or threat of damage to our body and signal this to the spinal cord and brain. This has led …
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Obesity: hamsters may hold the clue to beating it
1 month ago

Obesity: hamsters may hold the clue to beating it

The global obesity crisis shows no signs of abating, and we urgently need new ways to tackle it. Consuming fewer calories and burning more energy through physical activity is a proven way …
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Have asthma and a pet? Re-homing your cat or dog may not be necessary
2 months ago

Have asthma and a pet? Re-homing your cat or dog may not be necessary

A study from the Nationwide Children’s Hospital analyzed environmental exposures, like pet and secondhand smoke, to determine if they have a role in asthma control among children whose …
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Big data method could speed up the hunt for new drugs
2 months ago

Big data method could speed up the hunt for new drugs

Researchers have discovered a new anti-epileptic drug target and a whole new approach that promises to speed up the discovery of future drugs to treat debilitating diseases, including epilepsy.

The …
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3-D bioprinting of living structures with built-in chemical sensors
2 months ago

3-D bioprinting of living structures with built-in chemical sensors

An international team of researchers led by Professor Michael Kühl at the Department of Biology, University of Copenhagen has just published a breakthrough in 3D bioprinting. Together with …
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A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin
2 months ago

A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin

Scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor. Previously, they developed a flexible photovoltaic cell that could be …
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Vegan dogs: should canines go meat free?
2 months ago

Vegan dogs: should canines go meat free?

Over the last ten years, it’s estimated there has been a 360% rise in veganism in Britain – around 542,000 people have “gone vegan”. As a nation of animal lovers, with …
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Environmental DNA sniffs out sharks
2 months ago

Environmental DNA sniffs out sharks

A white shark’s acute sense of smell allows it to detect a potential meal several miles away. Now, using environmental DNA (eDNA), scientists—and someday, perhaps, any curious person—can sniff them …
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Tiny crystals could slash the cost of x-rays
2 months ago

Tiny crystals could slash the cost of x-rays

Since the 1890s, X-ray imaging technology has been widely used for many applications, including medical diagnostics, homeland security, national defense, advanced manufacturing, nuclear technology, and environmental monitoring.

Modern X-ray imaging …
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Three things we can all learn from people who don’t use smartphones or social media
2 months ago

Three things we can all learn from people who don’t use smartphones or social media

Many of us spend hours every day tethered to our devices, pawing at the screen to see if it will deliver a few more likes or emails, monitoring the world …
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Worried about AI taking over the world? You may be making some rather unscientific assumptions
2 months ago

Worried about AI taking over the world? You may be making some rather unscientific assumptions

Should we be afraid of artificial intelligence? For me, this is a simple question with an even simpler, two letter answer: no. But not everyone agrees – many people, including …
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Robotic trousers could help disabled people walk again
2 months ago

Robotic trousers could help disabled people walk again

Could the answer to mobility problems one day be as easy as pulling on a pair of trousers? A research team led by Bristol University’s Professor Jonathan Rossiter has recently unveiled a …
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Canine melanoma study identifies genetic basis of disease; potential drug targets
2 months ago

Canine melanoma study identifies genetic basis of disease; potential drug targets

As a veterinarian, Dr. Carolyn Duregger is familiar with the telltale signs of canine melanoma. So when she gave her own dog, Parker, a routine oral examination, the …
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Breakthrough could end animal testing in carcinogen research
2 months ago

Breakthrough could end animal testing in carcinogen research

Animal testing has been at the heart of chemical safety assessments since the 1970s. Looking at the most recent figures, in 2011, more than a million animals were used to test whether …
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Virtual 3D hearts may help doctors zap diseased tissue
2 months ago

Virtual 3D hearts may help doctors zap diseased tissue

Personalized 3D heart simulations can accurately identify tissue doctors should electrically destroy to stop potentially fatal irregular, rapid heartbeats.

A retrospective analysis of 21 patients with ventricular tachycardia and a …
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Decoding robotic surgery skills
2 months ago

Decoding robotic surgery skills

Researchers from the Keck School of Medicine of USC are looking to technology to help deconstruct expert surgeons’ robotic surgery skills so they can create an objective, standardized …
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Enhanced 3-D imaging poised to advance treatments for brain diseases
2 months ago

Enhanced 3-D imaging poised to advance treatments for brain diseases

Researchers have developed a combination of commercially available hardware and open-source software, named PySight, which improves rapid 2D and 3D imaging of the brain and other tissues. By …
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Scientists use bear saliva to rapidly test for antibiotics
2 months ago

Scientists use bear saliva to rapidly test for antibiotics

If you’re looking into the mouth of a brown bear, one of the world’s top predators, your chances of survival probably aren’t good. But a team of Rutgers …
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Rewiring rodent brains makes epilepsy seizures less severe
2 months ago

Rewiring rodent brains makes epilepsy seizures less severe

Researchers have discovered a new treatment for reducing seizure activity in the brains of rodents, a discovery they hope might one day help people living with epilepsy.

An estimated 2.2 …
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Wrist sensor is like a Fitbit that monitors your blood
2 months ago

Wrist sensor is like a Fitbit that monitors your blood

A new wristband with a wireless connection to smartphones could offer a better way to monitor personal health and environmental exposure.

The researchers describe the technology, which companies that make …
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Nasal spray could deliver cancer drugs right to brain
2 months ago

Nasal spray could deliver cancer drugs right to brain

Researchers have developed a noninvasive way to deliver drugs to the brainstem in patients with tumors in that part of the brain.

A person’s brainstem controls some of the body’s …
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How to protect your dog from deadly blue-green algae
2 months ago

How to protect your dog from deadly blue-green algae

Karyn Bischoff, toxicologist at the Cornell University College of Veterinary Medicine, explains the dangers and advises livestock and pet owners to be vigilant in avoiding contaminated areas.

Bischoff worked with …
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Why we love robotic dogs, puppets and dolls
2 months ago

Why we love robotic dogs, puppets and dolls

There’s a lot of hype around the release of Sony’s latest robotic dog. It’s called “aibo,” and is promoted as using artificial intelligence to respond to people looking at it, talking …
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Lending a helping paw: Dogs will aid their crying human
2 months ago

Lending a helping paw: Dogs will aid their crying human

From Lassie to Balto, pop culture loves stories of a dog coming to a person’s rescue. Anecdotally, people experience their dogs coming to their aid every day, like when one of us found …
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Do cats purr when humans aren’t around?
2 months ago

Do cats purr when humans aren’t around?

Why do cats purr? Humans tend to think that purring is a sign of happiness in a cat – and indeed it can be – but there are other reasons …
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Why cats are fussy eaters but dogs will consume almost anything
2 months ago

Why cats are fussy eaters but dogs will consume almost anything

Anyone who’s watched a cat throwing up after munching on grass knows that our feline friends aren’t natural plant eaters. So you might be surprised to discover that these carnivorous …
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Are you walking your dog enough?
3 months ago

Are you walking your dog enough?

Australia has nearly five million dogs, with nearly 40% of Australian households owning one.

But it seems that 40% of Australian dogs are not walked enough and that a similar percentage of dogs are overweight …
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Cats and dogs: are they the superbug risk everyone has overlooked?
3 months ago

Cats and dogs: are they the superbug risk everyone has overlooked?

We’re all well aware of the growing threat of superbugs. There are plenty warnings about how we encourage these antibiotic-resistant bacteria by either overusing antibiotics or not finishing a prescribed …
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Biomarker suggests another perk of service dogs for veterans
3 months ago

Biomarker suggests another perk of service dogs for veterans

Veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder may benefit physiologically from using service dogs, new research shows.

“Our long-term research goal is to quantify how service dogs may affect the health and …
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How dogs, cats and goldfish view the world
3 months ago

How dogs, cats and goldfish view the world

Human eyes aren’t particularly adept at distinguishing colors or seeing in dim light, when compared to those of many other animals. But when it comes visual acuity, we’re able to …
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Researchers 3D print prototype for ‘bionic eye’
3 months ago

Researchers 3D print prototype for ‘bionic eye’

A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota have, for the first time, fully 3D printed an array of light receptors on a hemispherical surface. This discovery …
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We’re using technology to find out how antidepressants effect animal behaviour
3 months ago

We’re using technology to find out how antidepressants effect animal behaviour

Antidepressants don’t just affect human libidos. New research shows that female starlings fed food spiked with the antidepressant fluxoxetine (Prozac), were less “attractive” to males and so less likely to mate. This …
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Do dogs have feelings?
3 months ago

Do dogs have feelings?

If you live with a dog you just know when it’s happy or miserable, don’t you? Of course you do. Even the scientific community, now admits that dogs have emotions – even if scientists …
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Dogs bust through boundaries to comfort their people
3 months ago

Dogs bust through boundaries to comfort their people

Dogs not only go out of their way to comfort their upset owner, but will overcome obstacles to do it quickly, experiments show.

In the journal Learning & Behavior, researchers show …
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Collagen could spare diabetic dogs and people daily shots
3 months ago

Collagen could spare diabetic dogs and people daily shots

A collagen formulation mixed with pancreatic cells is the first minimally invasive therapy to successfully reverse type 1 diabetes within 24 hours and maintain insulin independence for at least 90 …
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Material could offer ‘smarter’ wound healing
4 months ago

Material could offer ‘smarter’ wound healing

A new study takes a step toward the development of smarter skin grafts that facilitate healing while minimising infection for chronic skin wounds.

“Our group has expertise in developing new …
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Postbiotics and smart toilets: new era of harnessing our microbial chemicals
6 months ago

Postbiotics and smart toilets: new era of harnessing our microbial chemicals

Ever since Alexander Fleming discovered penicillin growing naturally on a petri dish, we have been aware of the power of chemicals produced by microbes. But we have only recently realised …
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Scientists reanimate disembodied pigs’ brains
6 months ago

Scientists reanimate disembodied pigs’ brains

Do you want to live forever? If so, there’s some good news. Or so it seems. For it appears that we may have taken a step closer to making immortality …
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Evidence shows animals can play back memories
6 months ago

Evidence shows animals can play back memories

Researchers have found the first evidence that non-human animals can mentally replay past events from memory. The discovery could help advance the development of new drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease.


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Tool gives scientists a glimpse of real-time brain activity
6 months ago

Tool gives scientists a glimpse of real-time brain activity

A new invention could give researchers a dynamic tool to study the brain’s role in various behaviors.

It’s a neuroscientist’s dream: being able to track the millions of interactions among …
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Implanting stem cell ‘patch’ can restore vision
6 months ago

Implanting stem cell ‘patch’ can restore vision

Researchers have developed a specially engineered retinal patch to treat people with sudden, severe sight loss.

In July 2015, 86-year-old Douglas Waters developed severe age-related macular degeneration. He struggled to …
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End of ageing and cancer? Scientists unveil structure of the ‘immortality’ enzyme telomerase
7 months ago

End of ageing and cancer? Scientists unveil structure of the ‘immortality’ enzyme telomerase

Making a drug is like trying to pick a lock at the molecular level. There are two ways in which you can proceed. You can try thousands of different keys …
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These dentures deliver drugs to battle infection
7 months ago

These dentures deliver drugs to battle infection

Researchers have created 3D-printed dentures that can deliver drugs to prevent the kinds of infections that affect so many people who use artificial teeth.

Nearly two-thirds of the US denture-wearing …
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3D-printed bio-ink brings platelets to injuries
7 months ago

3D-printed bio-ink brings platelets to injuries

Researchers have incorporated platelet-rich plasma into a bio-ink: a 3D-printed mixture of cells and gel that could eventually be part of skin grafts and regenerative tissue implants.

If injury strikes …
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Smart phone as a faster infection detector
7 months ago

Smart phone as a faster infection detector

Washington State University researchers have developed a low-cost, portable laboratory on a phone that works nearly as well as clinical laboratories to detect common viral and bacterial infections.


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New cell therapy aids heart recovery — without implanting cells
7 months ago

New cell therapy aids heart recovery — without implanting cells

Heart disease is a major global health problem — myocardial infarction annually affects more than one million people in the U.S. alone, and there is still no effective …
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Five reasons why robots won’t take over the world
7 months ago

Five reasons why robots won’t take over the world

Scientists are known for making dramatic predictions about the future – and sinister robotsare once again in the spotlight now that artificial intelligence has become a marketing tool for all sorts of different …
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Implant would put a mole on your skin to warn of tumour
7 months ago

Implant would put a mole on your skin to warn of tumour

A prototype early warning system for the four most common types of cancer makes a visible mole appear on the skin when calcium levels indicate a tumor has developed.

Many …
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‘Smart socks’ enhance telemedicine for physical therapy
7 months ago

‘Smart socks’ enhance telemedicine for physical therapy

A pair of “smart socks” might offer a solution to the limitations of video consultations with physiotherapists and other specialists, report researchers.

Consulting via video saves patients’ time and money, …
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3D-printed cervixes teach how to screen for cancer
7 months ago

3D-printed cervixes teach how to screen for cancer

A new device could help train doctors and nurses in developing countries and low-resource areas of the US to screen for cervical cancer—and improve the health outlook for women with …
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Rights of the dead and living clash when DNA from human remains is extracted
7 months ago

Rights of the dead and living clash when DNA from human remains is extracted

The remains of a 6-inch long mummy from Chile are not those of a space alien, according to recently reported research. The tiny body with its strange features – a pointed …
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AI like HAL 9000 can never exist because real emotions aren’t programmable
7 months ago

AI like HAL 9000 can never exist because real emotions aren’t programmable

HAL 9000 is one of the best-known artificial intelligence characters of modern film. This superior form of sentient computer embarks on a mission to Jupiter, along with a human crew, in Stanley …
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A.I. creates ‘maps’ of immune system fighting cancer
7 months ago

A.I. creates ‘maps’ of immune system fighting cancer

Using artificial intelligence and deep learning on very high-resolution images of tumor tissue, researchers produced maps of how the immune system fights cancer.

By combining data on pathology images of …
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CRISPR and DNA ‘barcode’ track cancer growth
8 months ago

CRISPR and DNA ‘barcode’ track cancer growth

Scientists have found a way to modify pairs of cancer-related genes in the lungs of mice and then precisely track individual cells of the resulting tumor.

The combined technique could …
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Cat-like ‘hearing’ with device tens of trillions times smaller than human eardrum
8 months ago

Cat-like ‘hearing’ with device tens of trillions times smaller than human eardrum

Case Western Reserve University researchers achieve cat-like ‘hearing’ with device 10,000,000,000,000 times smaller than human eardrum.

Researchers at Case Western Reserve University are developing atomically thin “drumheads” able …
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Solution to 50-year-old mystery could lead to blood disorder gene therapy
8 months ago

Solution to 50-year-old mystery could lead to blood disorder gene therapy

In a landmark study that could lead to new therapies for sickle cell anemia and other blood disorders, UNSW Sydney-led researchers have used CRISPR gene editing to introduce …
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Monkeys’ brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor task
8 months ago

Monkeys’ brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor task

Though their purpose and function are still largely unknown, mirror neurons in the brain are believed by some neuroscientists to be central to how humans relate to each …
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Your dog may be your perfect training partner
8 months ago

Your dog may be your perfect training partner

January is the month of ambitious resolutions – and getting fit and losing weight tend to top the list. But how many people manage to maintain their exercise goals? Gyms …
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A brief history (and a look into the future) of fitness technology
8 months ago

A brief history (and a look into the future) of fitness technology

Have you recently taken ownership of a shiny new activity tracking device? For many people, the essential fitness kit now includes gadgets designed not for sitting and staring at a …
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‘Fish hooks’ speed up the search for new drugs
8 months ago

‘Fish hooks’ speed up the search for new drugs

Researchers have developed a new screening method that speeds up the search for drugs, making it cheaper and more efficient.

At the center of the method is a new DNA-encoded …
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Polymers that mimic chameleon skin
8 months ago

Polymers that mimic chameleon skin

Biological tissues have complex mechanical properties — soft-yet-strong, tough-yet-flexible — that are difficult to reproduce using synthetic materials. An international team has managed to produce a biocompatible synthetic …
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A.I. may spot heart failure signs early
8 months ago

A.I. may spot heart failure signs early

A new method that uses deep learning to analyze vast amounts of personal health record data could identify early signs of heart failure, researchers say.

A paper, which appears in …
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‘Brain stethoscope’ turns brain waves into sound
8 months ago

‘Brain stethoscope’ turns brain waves into sound

New research shows that medical students and nurses—non-specialists, in other words—can listen to a new “brain stethoscope” and reliably detect so-called silent seizures—a neurological condition where patients have epileptic seizures …
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Why computer simulations should replace animal testing for heart drugs
8 months ago

Why computer simulations should replace animal testing for heart drugs

Safety is imperative before new medicines are given to patients – which is why drugs are tested on millions of animals worldwide each year to detect possible risks and side …
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The science behind why some people love animals and others couldn’t care less
8 months ago

The science behind why some people love animals and others couldn’t care less

The recent popularity of “designer” dogs, cats, micro-pigs and other pets may seem to suggest that pet keeping is no more than a fad. Indeed, it is often assumed that …
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Explaining coprophagy – why do dogs eat their own poo?
8 months ago

Explaining coprophagy – why do dogs eat their own poo?

Dogs are scavengers. As many dog owners know to their cost, dogs often have a penchant for things that we find less than palatable. If it’s not counter or table …
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How CRISPR could fight genetic hearing loss
8 months ago

How CRISPR could fight genetic hearing loss

Gene editing could one day help people at risk of losing their hearing due to genetic mutations, according to new research.

Xue (Sherry) Gao, an assistant professor of chemical and …
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Chunky monkeys hint obesity risk starts before birth
11 months ago

Chunky monkeys hint obesity risk starts before birth

A new study with vervet monkeys suggests how genes, pedigree, and environment work together to influence adult obesity.

In 2004, the monkeys of the Vervet Research Colony got an unpleasant …
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Tags sewn into clothes could monitor vital signs
11 months ago

Tags sewn into clothes could monitor vital signs

A new system for monitoring vital signs like blood pressure, heart rate, and breath rate uses a cheap and covert system of radio-frequency signals and microchip “tags,” similar to the …
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Spider web-inspired implant could change insulin delivery
11 months ago

Spider web-inspired implant could change insulin delivery

Researchers have created a method for implanting hundreds of thousands of insulin-producing pancreatic cell clusters into diabetes patients to help manage the disease.

A thin hydrogel coating protects the cell …
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Scientists aim to turn off mosquito genes for biting
11 months ago

Scientists aim to turn off mosquito genes for biting

Focusing on Wyeomyia smithii, also known as pitcher plant mosquitoes, researchers have pinpointed and sorted out 902 genes related to blood feeding and 478 genes linked to non-blood feeding among …
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Why are so many of our pets overweight?
11 months ago

Why are so many of our pets overweight?

When I looked at my appointment book for the day, I thought something must be wrong. Someone who worked in the fitness industry was bringing his cat in to the …
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If your New Year’s resolution is to get fit, your dog may be your perfect training partner
11 months ago

If your New Year’s resolution is to get fit, your dog may be your perfect training partner

January is the month of ambitious resolutions – and getting fit and losing weight tend to top the list. But how many people manage to maintain their exercise goals? Gyms …
Read More

Jellyfish have superpowers – and other reasons they don’t deserve their bad reputation
11 months ago

Jellyfish have superpowers – and other reasons they don’t deserve their bad reputation

People rarely enjoy meeting a jellyfish. On the beach they appear limp, amorphous, and blistered in the sun. In the water it’s often a brush of a tentacle on exposed …
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Reprogramming bacteria could be the answer to antibiotic resistance
11 months ago

Reprogramming bacteria could be the answer to antibiotic resistance

Changing someone’s genetic programming is easier than you might think. While techniques for altering DNA at the molecular level are becoming more widely used, it’s also possible to simply turn …
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Killer robots, free will and the illusion of control
11 months ago

Killer robots, free will and the illusion of control

Control. We all like to think we have it, but is it all just an illusion? It might seem like a very existential question but it plays an important part …
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The libraries of the future will be made of DNA
11 months ago

The libraries of the future will be made of DNA

There are 6,000 tweets sent a second. In the time you have read this sentence, 42,000 tweets will have been sent. At an average of 34 characters per tweet that’s …
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Better, cheaper bio-ink may be used to create artificial organs
11 months ago

Better, cheaper bio-ink may be used to create artificial organs

A new bio-ink that may support a more efficient and inexpensive fabrication of human tissues and organs has been created by researchers at UBC’s Okanagan campus.

Keekyoung Kim, an assistant …
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App looks at your pupil to detect concussion
11 months ago

App looks at your pupil to detect concussion

A smartphone app could detect concussions and other brain injuries in the field, whether on the sidelines of a sports game, on the battlefield, or in the home of older …
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Sheep gene insights could help farmers breed healthier animals
11 months ago

Sheep gene insights could help farmers breed healthier animals

Fresh insights into the genetic code of sheep could aid breeding programmes to improve their health and productivity.

Scientists have mapped which genes are turned on and off in the …
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Welfare of zoo animals set to improve
11 months ago

Welfare of zoo animals set to improve

The wellbeing of zoological animals is set to improve following the successful trial of a new welfare assessment grid, a new study in the journal Veterinary Record reports.

Researchers from …
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Warm-up could obliterate 33% of Earth’s parasites
11 months ago

Warm-up could obliterate 33% of Earth’s parasites

Changing climate around the globe could cause the extinction of up to a third of the world’s parasite species by 2070, report researchers.

Parasites are one of the most threatened …
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Drones and wildlife – working to co-exist
11 months ago

Drones and wildlife – working to co-exist

The drone market is booming and it is changing the way we use airspace, with some unforeseen consequences.

The uptake of remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) has been swift. But despite …
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Puppy-farmed dogs show worse behaviour, suffer ill health and die young – so adopt, don’t shop
11 months ago

Puppy-farmed dogs show worse behaviour, suffer ill health and die young – so adopt, don’t shop

There are an estimated 8.5m dogs in Britain, and demand means that unscrupulous people are happy to breed and sell dogs at a profit with scant thought for their welfare. …
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Molecules drill into cells to deliver drugs or kill
11 months ago

Molecules drill into cells to deliver drugs or kill

Motorized molecules can drill holes in cell membranes to either deliver drugs or kill the cell, researchers report.

In lab tests, the researchers demonstrated how rotors in single-molecule nanomachines can …
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A tiny device offers insights to how cancer spreads
11 months ago

A tiny device offers insights to how cancer spreads

As cancer grows, it evolves. Individual cells become more aggressive and break away to flow through the body and spread to distant areas.

What if there were a way to …
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3-D-printed biomaterials that degrade on demand
11 months ago

3-D-printed biomaterials that degrade on demand

Brown University engineers have demonstrated a technique for making 3-D-printed biomaterials that can degrade on demand, which can be useful in making intricately patterned microfluidic devices or in making cell …
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Human skin cells transformed directly into motor neurons
11 months ago

Human skin cells transformed directly into motor neurons

Scientists working to develop new treatments for neurodegenerative diseases have been stymied by the inability to grow human motor neurons in the lab. Motor neurons drive muscle contractions, and their …
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‘Pen’ flags cancer in about 10 seconds
11 months ago

‘Pen’ flags cancer in about 10 seconds

A new device rapidly and accurately identifies cancerous tissue during surgery, delivering results in about 10 seconds—more than 150 times as fast as existing technology.

The handheld MasSpec Pen gives …
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Tiny gold specks may cut false positives in medical tests
11 months ago

Tiny gold specks may cut false positives in medical tests

Researchers have created a new biomedical assay that eliminates the readout of “false positive” results in medical tests for pregnancy, allergies, infectious disease, and more. It could lead to far …
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Seeing’ robot learns tricky technique for studying brain cells in mammals
11 months ago

Seeing’ robot learns tricky technique for studying brain cells in mammals

Whole-cell patch clamp electrophysiology, or whole-cell recording (WCR), is the gold-standard technique for studying the behaviour of brain cells called neurons under different brain states such as stress or learning.


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Blunting CRISPR’s ‘scissors’ gives new insight into autoimmune disorders
11 months ago

Blunting CRISPR’s ‘scissors’ gives new insight into autoimmune disorders

Each one of our cells has the same 22,000 or so genes in its genome, but each uses different combinations of those same genes, turning them on and off as …
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Protecting the guardians
12 months ago

Protecting the guardians

Keeping the immune system in balance is no small feat. It must remain keenly alert to spot and disarm foreign invaders and smart enough to recognize the body’s own tissues …
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Tiny DNA capsules smuggle molecules into cells
12 months ago

Tiny DNA capsules smuggle molecules into cells

A team of scientists has designed a way to use microscopic capsules made out of DNA to deliver a payload of tiny molecules directly into a cell.

The technique gives …
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We’re still using these ancient fish gut genes
12 months ago

We’re still using these ancient fish gut genes

A network of genes in the lining of the intestines—many linked to human illnesses such as inflammatory bowel diseases, diabetes, and obesity—have stayed remarkably the same from fish to humans …
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3D ‘encyclopedia’ to show vertebrates inside and out
12 months ago

3D ‘encyclopedia’ to show vertebrates inside and out

A new initiative will take specimens from museum shelves to the internet by CT scanning 20,000 vertebrates and making the 3D images available to researchers, educators, students, and you.

The …
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Will CRISPR fears fade with familiarity?
12 months ago

Will CRISPR fears fade with familiarity?

The first “test-tube baby” made headlines around the world in 1978, setting off intense debate on the ethics of researching human embryos and reproductive technologies. Every breakthrough since then has …
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Of mice and men: why animal trial results don’t always translate to humans
12 months ago

Of mice and men: why animal trial results don’t always translate to humans

Throughout the era of modern medicine, animals have been used extensively to develop and test therapies before they are tested in humans. Virtually every medical therapy in use today – …
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Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control – new research
12 months ago

Why abseiling spiders don’t spin out of control – new research

Seeing an abseiling spider descend gracefully using its dragline silk instead of spinning unpredictably and uncontrollably, led us to try and understand the science behind it.

Spiders use dragline silk …
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Self-powered paper-based ‘SPEDs’ may lead to new medical-diagnostic tools
12 months ago

Self-powered paper-based ‘SPEDs’ may lead to new medical-diagnostic tools

A new medical-diagnostic device made out of paper detects biomarkers and identifies diseases by performing electrochemical analyses — powered only by the user’s touch — and reads out the color-coded …
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Genome cloaking keeps private genetic info hidden
12 months ago

Genome cloaking keeps private genetic info hidden

Researchers have developed a method for keeping private genetic information protected when scouring complete human genomes for the presence of disease-associated genes.

This “genome cloaking” technique ameliorates many concerns about …
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You and some ‘cavemen’ get a genetic checkup
12 months ago

You and some ‘cavemen’ get a genetic checkup

Had an arrow in his back not felled the legendary Iceman some 5,300 years ago, he would have likely dropped dead from a heart attack. Written in the DNA of …
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Allergies? Exhausted regulatory T cells may play a role
12 months ago

Allergies? Exhausted regulatory T cells may play a role

Researchers have evidence that the specialized T cells responsible for maintaining a balanced immune response are vulnerable to exhaustion that disrupts normal functioning and may even contribute to allergic reactions. …
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Anti-sense’ RNA aids repair of damaged nerves
12 months ago

Anti-sense’ RNA aids repair of damaged nerves

Scientists have discovered that an “anti-sense” RNA (AS-RNA) is expressed after nerve injury to regulate how the damaged nerves rebuild their coating of myelin.

That myelin, like the cladding around …
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The pets of the future will be robots!
12 months ago

The pets of the future will be robots!

Over half of the people in western society spend their lives with pets and our shared history goes back tens of thousands of years. But, how will a technological revolution …
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Answering the question that won me the Ig Nobel prize: Are cats liquid?
12 months ago

Answering the question that won me the Ig Nobel prize: Are cats liquid?

A liquid is traditionally defined as a material that adapts its shape to fit a container. Yet under certain conditions, cats seem to fit this definition.

This somewhat paradoxical observation …
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Lasers used to detect risk of heart attack and stroke
12 months ago

Lasers used to detect risk of heart attack and stroke

Patients at risk of heart attacks and strokes may be spotted earlier thanks to a diagnosis tool that uses near-infrared light to identify high-risk arterial plaques, according to research carried …
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Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery safer
12 months ago

Mussel-inspired glue could one day make fetal surgery safer

Whether to perform surgery on a fetus is a heart-wrenching decision. This type of surgery involves penetrating the highly delicate amniotic sac, increasing health risks to the fetus. Now researchers …
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Science hasn’t seen 99% of the microbes in your body
12 months ago

Science hasn’t seen 99% of the microbes in your body

A new survey of DNA fragments circulating in human blood suggests our bodies contain vastly more diverse microbes than anyone previously understood.

In fact, 99 percent of that DNA is …
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Why we should expect scientists to disagree about antibiotic resistance – and other controversies
12 months ago

Why we should expect scientists to disagree about antibiotic resistance – and other controversies

On numerous matters including food, health and the environment, experts are called upon to communicate the implications of scientific evidence for particular choices. It may be tempting to highlight simple …
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Origami-inspired robot
12 months ago

Origami-inspired robot

New research from a team of University of Illinois Mechanical Science and engineering professors and students, published as an invited paper in Smart Materials and Structures, details how origami structures …
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We owe a bit of our skull shape to cheese
12 months ago

We owe a bit of our skull shape to cheese

The advent of farming, especially dairy farming, had a small but significant effect on the shape of human skulls, research suggests.

Put another way, the invention of cheese changed our …
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Gene therapy using ‘junk DNA’ could lower risk for heart disease
12 months ago

Gene therapy using ‘junk DNA’ could lower risk for heart disease

Scientists from UCLA and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute successfully used a gene that suppresses cholesterol levels as part of a treatment to reduce plaque in mice with a disorder …
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Everything you need to know about cloning
12 months ago

Everything you need to know about cloning

It is inevitable that one day we will have to say a final goodbye to our pets as sadly, they just don’t live long enough. Some pet owners find …
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Augmented reality technology may help guide plastic and reconstructive surgery
12 months ago

Augmented reality technology may help guide plastic and reconstructive surgery

A plastic surgery research group has developed an augmented reality system that enables them to create 3D simulations of the desired results of facial reconstructive procedures and project them over …
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Scientists develop novel ‘dot’ system to improve cancer detection
12 months ago

Scientists develop novel ‘dot’ system to improve cancer detection

Researchers at Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute (SBP) have developed a proof-of-concept nanosystem that dramatically improves the visualization of tumors. Published in Nature Communications, the platform achieves a five-fold …
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Fossils reveal how bizarre mammal beat extinction
12 months ago

Fossils reveal how bizarre mammal beat extinction

Animals that live on islands are among the most at risk from extinction. A remarkable eighty percent of extinctions occurring since 1500AD have been on islands, with inhabitants facing dangers …
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To screen for pancreatic cancer, take a selfie with new app
1 year ago

To screen for pancreatic cancer, take a selfie with new app

A new app could let people easily screen themselves for pancreatic cancer and other diseases, all by snapping a selfie with their smartphone.

Pancreatic cancer has one of the worst …
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Musician plays sax during surgery to remove brain tumor
1 year ago

Musician plays sax during surgery to remove brain tumor

Music teacher Dan Fabbio had a tumor in his brain—and in an area responsible for music function. His journey to recovery culminated with him awake and playing a saxophone as …
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It’s not a rat’s race for human stem cells grafted to repair spinal cord injuries
1 year ago

It’s not a rat’s race for human stem cells grafted to repair spinal cord injuries

More than one-and-a-half years after implantation, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the San Diego Veterans Administration Medical Center report that human neural stem cells …
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DNA sequencing is vulnerable to this sneaky attack
1 year ago

DNA sequencing is vulnerable to this sneaky attack

Researchers have found evidence of poor computer security practices among common, open-source DNA processing programs.

Rapid improvement in DNA sequencing has sparked a proliferation of medical and genetic tests that …
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DNA blood test may spot cancer early
1 year ago

DNA blood test may spot cancer early

Scientists have developed a blood test that spots tiny amounts of cancer-specific DNA, a step towards accurate screening of seemingly healthy patients for early stage cancers.

The noninvasive test correctly …
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5 technologies that are disrupting veterinary medicine
1 year ago

5 technologies that are disrupting veterinary medicine

We are at the dawn of a technological revolution which will see a complete disruption of both human and veterinary medicine. Bleeding-edge technologies are being leveraged to achieve things …
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Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them
1 year ago

Slowing dangerous bacteria may be more effective than killing them

Researchers at the University of Illinois have discovered a mechanism that allows bacteria of the same species to communicate when their survival is threatened. The study suggests it may be …
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Artificial womb raises hope for premature babies
1 year ago

Artificial womb raises hope for premature babies

An artificial womb has been successfully used to incubate healthy baby lambs for a period of one week, and researchers hope the technology will one day be able to do …
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Gut microbes may talk to the brain through cortisol
1 year ago

Gut microbes may talk to the brain through cortisol

Gut microbes have been in the news a lot lately. Recent studies show they can influence human health, behavior, and certain neurological disorders, such as autism. But just how do …
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Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells
1 year ago

Repairing damaged hearts with self-healing heart cells

New research has discovered a potential means to trigger damaged heart cells to self-heal. The discovery could lead to groundbreaking forms of treatment for heart diseases. For the first time, …
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Scientists aim to ease blindness with video goggles
1 year ago

Scientists aim to ease blindness with video goggles

Scientists are still a long way from creating a visual prosthesis that works as well as a real human eye. But, engineers are making steady progress in what was once …
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Gut bacteria chemicals keep old animals young. Us, too?
1 year ago

Gut bacteria chemicals keep old animals young. Us, too?

A class of chemicals, called indoles, made by intestinal bacteria help worms, flies, and mice stay mobile and resilient longer in their lives, report researchers.

“This is a direct avenue …
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Sheep can recognise celebs from photos, says amusing study with serious potential
1 year ago

Sheep can recognise celebs from photos, says amusing study with serious potential

Sheep are surprisingly smart. New research from the University of Cambridge shows the animals can learn to recognise people from photographs, even people they’ve never seen in real life, such …
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Are dogs trying to tell us something with their expressions?
1 year ago

Are dogs trying to tell us something with their expressions?

Dogs have been part of human social groups for at least 30,000 years. So it’s not unreasonable to suppose that we might have had some influence on their behaviour, and …
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Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapy
1 year ago

Boy is given new skin thanks to gene therapy

A medical team at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum’s burn unit and the Center for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Modena (Italy) were the first ever to successfully treat a child …
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Future robots won’t resemble humans – we’re too inefficient
1 year ago

Future robots won’t resemble humans – we’re too inefficient

Humanoid robots are a vanity project: an attempt to create artificial life in our own image – essentially trying to play God. The problem is, we’re not very good at …
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60th anniversary of Laika’s historic space mission
1 year ago

60th anniversary of Laika’s historic space mission

On this day in 1957, the Soviet Union launched the first animal into space. Laika, a Siberian husky cross, was living as a stray on the streets of Moscow …
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Sorry, aging is ‘mathematically inevitable’
1 year ago

Sorry, aging is ‘mathematically inevitable’

Aging is impossible to stop in multicellular organisms, a new mathematical study suggests.

“You might be able to slow down aging but you can’t stop it…”

“Aging is mathematically inevitable—like, …
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Mapping the microbiome of … everything
1 year ago

Mapping the microbiome of … everything

In the Earth Microbiome Project, an extensive global team co-led by researchers at University of California San Diego, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, University of Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory collected …
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Spider silk could be used to power microphones in hearing aids, cell phones
1 year ago

Spider silk could be used to power microphones in hearing aids, cell phones

Would you want a spider web inside your ear? Probably not. But if you’re able to put aside the creepy factor, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New …
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Can you train yourself to develop ‘super senses’?
1 year ago

Can you train yourself to develop ‘super senses’?

 

Wouldn’t it be great to be able to hear what people whispered behind your back? Or to read the bus timetable from across the street? We all differ dramatically …
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Can gold nanostars and lasers vaccinate against cancer?
1 year ago

Can gold nanostars and lasers vaccinate against cancer?

When researchers combined an FDA-approved cancer immunotherapy with a new tumour-roasting nanotechnology, both therapies improved, according to a new proof-of-concept study.

Further, the potent combination also attacked satellite tumours and …
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Your dog might want praise even more than food
1 year ago

Your dog might want praise even more than food

Given the choice, many dogs prefer praise from their owners over food, according to one of the first studies to combine brain-imaging data with behavioral experiments to explore canine reward …
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How genomic techniques can pin down rare genetic diseases more quickly
1 year ago

How genomic techniques can pin down rare genetic diseases more quickly

Rare disorders are very challenging to diagnose. With about 7000 diagnosed disorders across the world, doctors are often unfamiliar with all the distinguishing features of a particular condition or confuse …
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What elephants teach us about cancer prevention
1 year ago

What elephants teach us about cancer prevention

Every time a cell divides, there is a chance for a mutation (mistake) to occur in the DNA – the substance that carries genetic information in all living organisms. These …
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How robots can help us embrace a more human view of disability
1 year ago

How robots can help us embrace a more human view of disability

When dealing with the otherness of disability, the Victorians in their shame built huge out-of-sight asylums, and their legacy of “them” and “us” continues to this day. Two hundred years …
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Salmon sex moves mountains (very slowly)
1 year ago

Salmon sex moves mountains (very slowly)

Salmon play a significant role in shaping mountain landscapes, according to a new study that shows that when they spawn, the earth moves. But it only happens over the course …
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The benefits that a digital healthcare system could bring aren’t out of reach
1 year ago

The benefits that a digital healthcare system could bring aren’t out of reach

Imagine a day where you don’t have to wait weeks to see your GP, followed by a further wait for medical test results and then still more waiting before being …
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Better diagnostics for fungal infections are badly needed – here’s why
1 year ago

Better diagnostics for fungal infections are badly needed – here’s why

At an address to the UN in 2016, Margaret Chan, the then director general of the World Health Organisation (WHO), highlighted the issue of antimicrobial resistance, stating that it may …
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Hybrid ‘super-slugs’ are invading British gardens and we can’t stop them
1 year ago

Hybrid ‘super-slugs’ are invading British gardens and we can’t stop them

The Daily Mail calls it a “slime wave”. The Sun calls them “an army”. Either way, both papers have reported 500 billion slugs are set to invade British gardens, after …
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Our ‘selfish’ genes contain the seeds of our destruction – but there might be a fix
1 year ago

Our ‘selfish’ genes contain the seeds of our destruction – but there might be a fix

The human race is in so much trouble that it needs to colonise another planet within 100 years or face extinction. So says the physicist Stephen Hawking in an upcoming …
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Genetic surveillance and why it’s critical in the fight against antimalarial drug resistance
1 year ago

Genetic surveillance and why it’s critical in the fight against antimalarial drug resistance

Efforts to tackle malaria infections over the past decades have yielded impressive results across the tropics, so much so that full elimination is now a public health priority for many …
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How man’s best friend is helping cancer treatment
1 year ago

How man’s best friend is helping cancer treatment

“A person can learn a lot from a dog, even a loopy one like ours. Marley taught me about living each day with unbridled exuberance and joy, about seizing the …
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East African hunter-gatherer research suggests the human microbiome is an ecological disaster zone
1 year ago

East African hunter-gatherer research suggests the human microbiome is an ecological disaster zone

The world we occupy today is very different from the one occupied by our not-so-distant ancestors. As we enter a new geological epoch – the Anthropocene, in which the human …
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Do you really want to know what’s lurking in your genome?
1 year ago

Do you really want to know what’s lurking in your genome?

Would you want to know if you were at a higher risk of getting dementia later in life? Would you want to know that you could die under general anaesthesia, …
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We all need to forget, even robots
1 year ago

We all need to forget, even robots

We all know what it’s like to forget something. A loved one’s birthday. A childhood memory. Even people capable of extraordinary memory feats– say, memorising the order of a deck of …
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Speeding up skin cancer detection
1 year ago

Speeding up skin cancer detection

Researchers have developed a new terahertz imaging approach that, for the first time, can acquire micron-scale resolution images while retaining computational approaches designed to speed up image acquisition. This combination …
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How genetics can uncover links in chronic pain and other conditions
1 year ago

How genetics can uncover links in chronic pain and other conditions

In the recent Global Burden of Disease study, four of the top ten causes of disability worldwide were chronic pain conditions. Chronic pain is defined as pain that lasts beyond …
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Mulberry leaf extract could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes
1 year ago

Mulberry leaf extract could reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes

Consuming refined carbohydrates is linked to a heightened risk of developing type 2 diabetes, not to mention heart disease. But what if a supplement could decrease the breakdown of carbohydrates …
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Organoids – the future of medical research
1 year ago

Organoids – the future of medical research

Most of the research behind new medical advances is carried out using either animal tissues or cancer cells. Both tools have their problems: results from animals and humans do not …
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Trading in extinction: how the pet trade is killing off many animal species
1 year ago

Trading in extinction: how the pet trade is killing off many animal species

Global biodiversity loss doesn’t just result from the destruction of habitats, or even hunting species for meat. A huge number of species are threatened by trade – both alive as …
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Microgravity may keep fractures from healing in space
1 year ago

Microgravity may keep fractures from healing in space

Bioengineers have discovered that microgravity, experienced in space, may inhibit cartilage formation.

The research suggests that healing fractures for astronauts in space—or patients on long bed rest here on Earth—could …
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Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancer
1 year ago

Artificial intelligence helps with earlier detection of skin cancer

New technology being developed by researchers at the University of Waterloo and the Sunnybrook Research Institute is using artificial intelligence (AI) to help detect melanoma skin cancer earlier.

The technology …
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Nanotechnology helps rewarm fast-frozen donor tissue, enabling long-term viability
1 year ago

Nanotechnology helps rewarm fast-frozen donor tissue, enabling long-term viability

A team funded in part by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) and led by University of Minnesota (UMN) researchers has developed a new method for thawing …
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Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other’s actions
1 year ago

Both chimpanzees and humans spontaneously imitate each other’s actions

Copying the behaviour of others makes us effective learners and allow skills, knowledge and inventions to be passed on from one generation to the next. Imitation is therefore viewed as …
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Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction
1 year ago

Even ugly animals can win hearts and dollars to save them from extinction

The Earth is home to millions of species, but you wouldn’t know it from the media’s obsession with only a few dozen animals like tigers and gorillas.

This narrow focus …
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Printing drugs would ease burden of multiple pills a day
1 year ago

Printing drugs would ease burden of multiple pills a day

A new technology can print pure, precisely customized doses of drugs.

The technology could enable on-site printing of custom-dosed medications at pharmacies, hospitals, and other locations.

The technique can print …
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CRISPR engineering used to prevent certain glaucoma in mice
1 year ago

CRISPR engineering used to prevent certain glaucoma in mice

A University of Iowa-led team of researchers has used the gene editing method called CRISPR-Cas9 to disrupt a mutant gene that is responsible for some forms of glaucoma, one of …
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New method for tissue regeneration, inspired by nature
1 year ago

New method for tissue regeneration, inspired by nature

Scientists have found a way of mimicking our body’s natural healing process, using cell derived nano-sized particles called vesicles, to repair damaged tissue.

The paper, published in Scientific Reports, …
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How yellow and blue make green in parrots
1 year ago

How yellow and blue make green in parrots

When it comes to spectacular displays of color, birds are obvious standouts in the natural world. Many brightly colored birds get their pigments from the foods that they eat, but …
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‘Squirtable’ elastic surgical glue seals wounds in 60 seconds
1 year ago

‘Squirtable’ elastic surgical glue seals wounds in 60 seconds

A highly elastic and adhesive surgical glue that quickly seals wounds without the need for common staples or sutures could transform how surgeries are performed.

Biomedical engineers from the University …
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Making surgery safer by enabling doctors to see nerves
1 year ago

Making surgery safer by enabling doctors to see nerves

During operations, it can be difficult for surgeons to avoid severing crucial nerves because they look so much like other tissue. A new noninvasive approach that uses polarized light to …
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The future of bone replacements
1 year ago

The future of bone replacements

A UBC Okanagan researcher has discovered a new artificial bone design that can be customized and made with a 3D printer for stronger, safer and more effective bone replacements.

Hossein …
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Raccoons solve an ancient puzzle, but do they really understand it?
1 year ago

Raccoons solve an ancient puzzle, but do they really understand it?

Scientists have been using an ancient Greek fable written by Aesop as inspiration to test whether birds and small children understand cause and effect relationships. In “The Crow and the …
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Electronic skin’ takes wearable health monitors to the next level
1 year ago

Electronic skin’ takes wearable health monitors to the next level

A new, electronic skin microsystem tracks heart rate, respiration, muscle movement and other health data, and wirelessly transmits it to a smartphone. The electronic skin offers several improvements over existing …
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How the red fox adapted to life in our towns and cities
1 year ago

How the red fox adapted to life in our towns and cities

Flexible foxes can be found in almost any sort of terrain. Indeed, one species, the red fox or Vulpes vulpes, is the most widely distributed land carnivore of all, ranging …
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Using dogs to find cats: overcoming the challenges of tracking cheetahs
1 year ago

Using dogs to find cats: overcoming the challenges of tracking cheetahs

Cheetahs are Africa’s rarest big cat. Only an estimated 7,000 individuals are thought to survive in the wild. They’re spread across 32 populations covering a vast area of more than …
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Losing a dog can be harder than losing a relative or friend
1 year ago

Losing a dog can be harder than losing a relative or friend

Recently, my wife and I went through one of the more excruciating experiences of our lives – the euthanasia of our beloved dog, Murphy. I remember making eye contact with …
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Why worms and fish are good models for epilepsy
1 year ago

Why worms and fish are good models for epilepsy

Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder in the UK – about 600,000 people have the condition. Unfortunately, for a third of those people, there are no effective treatments. But …
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DNA reveals how cats conquered the world
1 year ago

DNA reveals how cats conquered the world

Humans may have had pet cats for as long as 9,500 years. In 2004, archaeologists in Cyprus found a complete cat skeleton buried in a Stone Age village. Given that …
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A tough, self-healing rubber developed which could revolutionise medical devices
1 year ago

A tough, self-healing rubber developed which could revolutionise medical devices

Imagine a tire that could heal after being punctured or a rubber band that never snapped.

Researchers from the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) …
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The hormone that could be making your dog aggressive discovered
1 year ago

The hormone that could be making your dog aggressive discovered

For some dog owners, a leisurely walk can turn stressful the moment their canine companion sees another pup walking by. Dogs with what is known as “leash aggression” may bark, …
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How animals got their spots and stripes – according to maths
1 year ago

How animals got their spots and stripes – according to maths

The natural world presents a palette of beautiful complexity. From the peacock tail and the eyespots of a butterfly, to the evolving camouflage of the chameleon, nature loves patterns.

Biologists …
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Do cats purr when humans aren’t around?
1 year ago

Do cats purr when humans aren’t around?

Why do cats purr? Humans tend to think that purring is a sign of happiness in a cat – and indeed it can be – but there are other reasons …
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Study uncovers a link between genes and intelligence
1 year ago

Study uncovers a link between genes and intelligence

Exactly what constitutes intelligence, and to what extent it is genetic, are some of the most controversial questions in science. But now a new study of nearly 80,000 people, published …
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Five surprising ways holograms are revolutionising the world
1 year ago

Five surprising ways holograms are revolutionising the world

We seem to be fascinated by holograms or at least the promise of what they can do. Think the famous Princess Leia projection in Star Wars; holographic fashion shows in …
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Does your gut microbiome actually dictate what you choose to eat?
1 year ago

Does your gut microbiome actually dictate what you choose to eat?

Most of us believe in free will, particularly when it comes to our eating habits. That’s why most people don’t regard obesity as a disease but rather a moral weakness …
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The science behind why some people love animals and others couldn’t care less
1 year ago

The science behind why some people love animals and others couldn’t care less

The recent popularity of “designer” dogs, cats, micro-pigs and other pets may seem to suggest that pet keeping is no more than a fad. Indeed, it is often assumed that …
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Should we really move rhinos from Africa to Australia?
1 year ago

Should we really move rhinos from Africa to Australia?

Rhinos are one of the most iconic symbols of the African savanna: grey behemoths with armour plating and fearsome horns. And yet it is the horns that are leading to …
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Why we don’t trust robots
1 year ago

Why we don’t trust robots

Robots raise all kinds of concerns. They could steal our jobs, as some experts think. And if artificial intelligence grows, they might even be tempted to enslave us, or to …
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Nobel winners identified molecular ‘cogs’ in biological clocks
1 year ago

Nobel winners identified molecular ‘cogs’ in biological clocks

Circadian rhythms control when we’re at our peak performance physically and mentally each day, keeping our lives ticking in time with Earth’s day/night cycle. This year’s Nobel Prize in Physiology …
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Does a new era of bleaching beckon for Indian Ocean coral reefs?
1 year ago

Does a new era of bleaching beckon for Indian Ocean coral reefs?

Despite extensive media coverage, campaigns and scientists’ warnings, still the world is not fully aware of what coral bleaching is and why it is happening. Mention bleaching and some think …
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T cells more actively sniff out cancer than we thought
1 year ago

T cells more actively sniff out cancer than we thought

New research suggests that cancer-fighting T cells can find cancerous cells exhibiting much less evidence of the disease than researchers previously thought.

The research focuses on a problem facing scientists …
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How the search for mythical monsters can help conservation
1 year ago

How the search for mythical monsters can help conservation

After fears the Loch Ness Monster had “disappeared” last winter, a new sighting in May 2017 was celebrated by its enthusiasts. The search for monsters and mythical creatures (or “cryptids”) such as Nessie, the …
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Why you should donate your data (as well as your organs) when you die
1 year ago

Why you should donate your data (as well as your organs) when you die

Most people are aware they can donate their organs when they die. Doing so is very important: Each deceased donor can save several lives if he donates his organs and tissue and …
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Big-headed gecko shows human actions are messing with evolution
1 year ago

Big-headed gecko shows human actions are messing with evolution

Evolution doesn’t have to take millions of years. New research shows that a type of lizard living on man-made islands in Brazil has developed a larger head than its mainland cousins in …
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How close are we to a real Star Trek-style medical tricorder?
1 year ago

How close are we to a real Star Trek-style medical tricorder?

Does science inspire fiction or does it work the other way around? In the case of medical technology, the long-running TV and film series Star Trek has increasingly been inspiring …
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Mystery of how first animals appeared on Earth solved
1 year ago

Mystery of how first animals appeared on Earth solved

Research led by The Australian National University (ANU) has solved the mystery of how the first animals appeared on Earth, a pivotal moment for the planet without which …
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Melanoma tattoos: helping doctors develop empathy with patients
1 year ago

Melanoma tattoos: helping doctors develop empathy with patients

Competency is not the only thing you want from your doctor. Compassion and empathy are also requirements of the job. But with increasing demands and pressures in healthcare, it may …
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Battling to save the Ethiopian wolf – Africa’s rarest carnivore
1 year ago

Battling to save the Ethiopian wolf – Africa’s rarest carnivore

Most members of the Canidae family, such as wolves, dogs and foxes, are versatile and opportunistic animals, thriving in many habitats and some even living in urban and suburban settings. …
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Preventative medicine: the argument for and against
1 year ago

Preventative medicine: the argument for and against

Preventative medicine has long used drugs to prevent the onset of disease. Those with symptoms such as high blood sugar or pressure are often diagnosed with the “pre-condition”, such as …
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Pets can help children accept the challenges of foster care
1 year ago

Pets can help children accept the challenges of foster care

Stable, loving, secure family relationships are vital for child development and well-being. But many children who enter the foster care system have early experiences of neglect, suffering, hurt, and loss, …
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Personalized medicine may do more to treat rather than prevent chronic diseases
1 year ago

Personalized medicine may do more to treat rather than prevent chronic diseases

Personalized medicine, which involves tailoring health care to each person’s unique genetic makeup, has the potential to transform how we diagnose, prevent and treat disease. After all, no two people …
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Space tourism could help boost science and health research – here’s how
1 year ago

Space tourism could help boost science and health research – here’s how

The announcement of the draft Spaceflight Bill in the Queen’s Speech will allow the development of spaceports in the UK. This could see members of the paying public launched into …
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Google’s latest Go victory shows machines are no longer just learning, they’re teaching
1 year ago

Google’s latest Go victory shows machines are no longer just learning, they’re teaching

Just over 20 years ago was the first time a computer beat a human world champion in a chess match, when IBM’s Deep Blue supercomputer beat Gary Kasparov in a …
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The curious character of cats – and whether they are really more aloof
1 year ago

The curious character of cats – and whether they are really more aloof

To some people, cats are the perfect pet. Intelligent, elegant, calming companions, capable of dealing with their own exercise and cleaning. To others, they are frustratingly independent, cool and aloof. …
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Clever crows can plan for the future like humans do
1 year ago

Clever crows can plan for the future like humans do

Humans aren’t as unique as we used to think. Not, at least when it comes to making plans for the future. Scientists originally thought humans were the only animals that …
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Why can’t cats resist thinking inside the box?
1 year ago

Why can’t cats resist thinking inside the box?

Twitter’s been on fire with people amazed by cats that seem compelled to park themselves in squares of tape marked out on the floor. These felines appear powerless to resist …
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The bark side: domestic dogs threaten endangered species worldwide
1 year ago

The bark side: domestic dogs threaten endangered species worldwide

Humans and their canine companions share many close bonds. Wolves (Canis lupus) were the first animal domesticated by people, sometime between 15,000 and 50,000 years ago.

There are now an …
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How animals can help autistic children
1 year ago

How animals can help autistic children

Daniel the “emotional support duck” is a pretty big deal, both in the animal and human world. His 15 minutes of fame began after he was spotted on a flight …
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Why healthcare has become a target for cyber attackers
1 year ago

Why healthcare has become a target for cyber attackers

More than 16m patient records were stolen from healthcare organisations in the US and related parties in 2016. That year, healthcare was the fifth most targeted industry when it came …
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It’s a myth that humans’ sense of smell is inferior to other animals
1 year ago

It’s a myth that humans’ sense of smell is inferior to other animals

Conventional wisdom has it that humans have a poorer sense of smell than most other animals. Sure, we can smell – most of us appreciate the aroma of our morning …
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Why don’t hospitals use copper to kill superbugs?
1 year ago

Why don’t hospitals use copper to kill superbugs?

Fantasilandia in Chile, one of Latin America’s largest theme parks, has replaced its most frequently touched surfaces with copper to help reduce the spread of germs and protect the health …
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How a genetic rescue mission could save the pink pigeon
1 year ago

How a genetic rescue mission could save the pink pigeon

A research project using conservation genomics has been launched to save the Pink Pigeon in Mauritius. The Conversation Africa’s Samantha Spooner asked the projects lead researchers about the bird’s plight …
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How rare disease research is changing cancer treatment
1 year ago

How rare disease research is changing cancer treatment

Researching rare diseases and treatments can be a challenging task – not least because their rarity means there may be few patients available for genetic testing, and funding is likely …
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Pig-hunting dogs and humans at risk of swine brucellosis
1 year ago

Pig-hunting dogs and humans at risk of swine brucellosis

A disease called swine brucellosis is emerging in New South Wales, carried by feral pigs. Endemic to feral pigs in Queensland, and sometimes infecting the dogs used to hunt them, …
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Global genetic study sheds light on glaucoma
1 year ago

Global genetic study sheds light on glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of diseases that damage the eye’s optic nerve and results in vision loss and irreversible blindness in some people. The diseases usually occur on their own …
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How big data is being mobilised in the fight against leukaemia
1 year ago

How big data is being mobilised in the fight against leukaemia

Healthy cell function relies on well orchestrated gene activity. Via a fantastically complex network of interactions, around 30,000 genes cooperate to maintain this delicate balance in each of the 37.2 …
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Learning from zoos – how our environment can influence our health
1 year ago

Learning from zoos – how our environment can influence our health

We are told that we are a nation of couch potatoes, lacking the will and the strength to turn around the obesity tanker. We all need a little help in …
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Is there really a link between owning a cat and mental illness?
1 year ago

Is there really a link between owning a cat and mental illness?

Over the past few years, cats have increasingly attracted media attention due to a number of scientific studies reporting that a Toxoplasma Gondii (T. Gondii) infection is linked with mental …
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Animal emotions stare us in the face — are our pets happy?
1 year ago

Animal emotions stare us in the face — are our pets happy?

Scientists are starting to be able to accurately read animal facial expressions and understand what they communicate.

Facial expressions project our internal emotions to the outside world. Reading other people’s …
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Scientists balanced a dead flamingo on one leg to unlock the bird’s standing secret
1 year ago

Scientists balanced a dead flamingo on one leg to unlock the bird’s standing secret

Flamingos can stand on one leg for far longer than humans can. They can even do it while asleep. Now scientists have shed some more light on just how these …
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A possible alternative to morphine – inspired by spit
1 year ago

A possible alternative to morphine – inspired by spit

Would you take a painkiller that had been developed from human saliva? A recent study suggests you might in future.

Pain is an essential sensation. Sensory nerves with endings in …
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Zebrafish inspire retina regeneration in mice
1 year ago

Zebrafish inspire retina regeneration in mice

Scientists have successfully regenerated cells in the retina of adult mice, raising the hope that it may one day be possible to repair retinas damaged by eye diseases or trauma.


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3D printing living tissues to form living structures
1 year ago

3D printing living tissues to form living structures

Scientists at the University of Oxford have developed a new method to 3D-print laboratory- grown cells to form living structures.

The approach could revolutionise regenerative medicine, enabling the production of …
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Dogs’ social skills linked to oxytocin sensitivity
1 year ago

Dogs’ social skills linked to oxytocin sensitivity

The tendency of dogs to seek contact with their owners is associated with genetic variations in sensitivity for the hormone oxytocin, according to a new study from Linköping University, Sweden. …
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Genomes reveal cause of disease in rare cats
1 year ago

Genomes reveal cause of disease in rare cats

 

Researchers have used whole genome sequencing to identify DNA abnormalities that cause genetic diseases in cats, such as progressive retinal atrophy and Niemann-Pick type 1, a fatal disorder in …
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What ‘walkies’ says about your relationship with your dog
1 year ago

What ‘walkies’ says about your relationship with your dog

Dogs love “walkies”. And, unless it’s pouring with rain and blowing a gale, so do their owners. But there’s much more to this daily routine than you might think. In …
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How dogs could make children better readers
1 year ago

How dogs could make children better readers

Issues around children learning to read are rarely out of the news. Which is hardly surprising – becoming a successful reader is of paramount importance in improving a child’s life …
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How to talk to your dog – according to science
1 year ago

How to talk to your dog – according to science

Dogs are special. Every dog owner knows that. And most dog owners feel their dog understands every word they say and every move they make. Research over the last two …
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Why we should be worried about gene-carrier screening
1 year ago

Why we should be worried about gene-carrier screening

 

The ability to cheaply and quickly sequence entire genomes is changing the way diseases are identified and treated. But it is also likely to change the way we make …
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Scientists use magnetic fields to remotely stimulate brain — and control body movements
1 year ago

Scientists use magnetic fields to remotely stimulate brain — and control body movements

Scientists have used magnetism to activate tiny groups of cells in the brain, inducing bodily movements that include running, rotating and losing control of the extremities — an …
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Tiny robots in a mouse’s stomach help heal an ulcer
1 year ago

Tiny robots in a mouse’s stomach help heal an ulcer

Tiny micromotors about the width of a human hair travelled through a mouse’s stomach delivering antibiotics to treat a stomach ulcer. The motors are powered by bubbles. According to the …
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Something to sneeze about: Democratic voting in African wild dog packs
1 year ago

Something to sneeze about: Democratic voting in African wild dog packs

Scientists studying African wild dogs in Botswana have found members of this endangered species use sneezes to vote on when the pack will move off and start hunting.

The research, …
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Research dog helps scientists save endangered carnivores
1 year ago

Research dog helps scientists save endangered carnivores

Scat-sniffing research dogs are helping scientists map out a plan to save reclusive jaguars, pumas, bush dogs and other endangered carnivores in the increasingly fragmented forests of northeastern …
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Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach
1 year ago

Drug-delivering micromotors treat their first bacterial infection in the stomach

Nanoengineers at the University of California San Diego have demonstrated for the first time using micromotors to treat a bacterial infection in the stomach. These tiny vehicles, each about half …
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Genomes suggest where wolves became dogs
1 year ago

Genomes suggest where wolves became dogs

Researchers have found that prehistoric dogs from Germany may have been genetic ancestors to modern European dogs.

The finding suggests a single domestication event of modern dogs from a population …
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The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humans
1 year ago

The sixth mass genesis? New species are coming into existence faster than ever thanks to humans

 

Animals and plants are seemingly disappearing faster than at any time since the dinosaurs died out, 66m years ago. The death knell tolls for life on Earth. Rhinos will …
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‘Cellular time machine’ could eventually benefit humans, too
1 year ago

‘Cellular time machine’ could eventually benefit humans, too

UCLA biologists have developed an intervention that serves as a cellular time machine — turning back the clock on a key component of aging.

In a study on middle-aged fruit …
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Study reveals dogs have self awareness
1 year ago

Study reveals dogs have self awareness

A new research carried out by the Department of Psychology of the Barnard College in the USA, in publication on the journal Behavioural Processes used a sniff-test to evaluate the …
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Smartphone screen technology used to trick harmful bacteria
1 year ago

Smartphone screen technology used to trick harmful bacteria

Conducting plastics found in smartphone screens can be used to trick the metabolism of pathogenic bacteria, report scientists at the Swedish Medical Nanoscience Center at Karolinska Institutet in the scientific …
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The science behind maggot therapy
1 year ago

The science behind maggot therapy

Maggots have one goal in life: to feed. They gorge ravenously in order to grow as quickly as possible. Speed is of the essence as they leave behind their vulnerable …
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How parasites and bacteria could be changing the way you think and feel
1 year ago

How parasites and bacteria could be changing the way you think and feel

Given recent events around the world, you could be forgiven for thinking that people have been acting in a very odd and unpredictable manner. There has been much research across …
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The dark side of stem cell therapy
1 year ago

The dark side of stem cell therapy

Everyone seems to be excited about stem cells. Their excellent promise as a treatment for a range of diseases and injuries mean almost guaranteed coverage for research. While some types …
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‘Game of Thrones’ fans abandoning huskies at an alarming rate
1 year ago

‘Game of Thrones’ fans abandoning huskies at an alarming rate

Siberian huskies, the strong, wolf-like dogs originally bred for sled-pulling in the Arctic, have along with some of other wolf-esque breeds like the Alaskan malamute been gaining huge popularity …
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A big pawprint: The environmental impact of pet food
1 year ago

A big pawprint: The environmental impact of pet food

Pet food is an industry worth nearly US$25 billion in the United States. Owners make decisions about what to feed their pets based on marketing, personal beliefs and pet preference. …
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Dogs in Navi Mumbai are turning blue
1 year ago

Dogs in Navi Mumbai are turning blue

A number of very unusual-looking blue dogs have been spotted in Navi Mumbai, India. Sadly, the cause is industrial waste in the Kasadi river where stray dogs often wade. From …
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Scientists edit human embryos to safely remove disease for the first time – here’s how they did it
1 year ago

Scientists edit human embryos to safely remove disease for the first time – here’s how they did it

 

Scientists in the US have released a paper showing that they have successfully edited human embryos to correct a mutation that causes an inheritable heart condition. The findings are …
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5 ways 3D printing could totally change medicine
1 year ago

5 ways 3D printing could totally change medicine

A new study aims to alert medical professionals to the potential of 3D printing’s future use in the field.

3D printing technology is going to transform medicine, whether it is …
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Dogs trained to monitor beetles
1 year ago

Dogs trained to monitor beetles

Hermit beetles (Osmoderma eremita) are considered at risk, but in order to be effectively protected, they first need to be identified and consistently monitored.

However, this turns out to be …
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Will whoever controls gene editing control historical memory?
1 year ago

Will whoever controls gene editing control historical memory?

In July, Harvard scientists used a gene-editing technology first developed in 2013 to programme bacteria to do something astounding: play back an animation of a galloping horse.

The GIF animation …
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Your dog has a better memory than a chimpanzee
1 year ago

Your dog has a better memory than a chimpanzee

Any dog owner will tell you how smart they think their dog is. What we usually think of as smartness in dogs is measured or observed in their external behaviour. …
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New study reveals cats domesticated themselves
1 year ago

New study reveals cats domesticated themselves

In many cases, animal species are domesticated when humans bring them into their homes whether they want to be there or not. For example, it’s mostly accepted that humans domesticated …
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How penis bones help primates win the mating game – and why humans might have lost theirs
1 year ago

How penis bones help primates win the mating game – and why humans might have lost theirs

One of the most weird and wonderful products of evolution is the penis bone, or baculum. The baculum is an extra-skeletal bone, which means it is not attached to the …
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These weird creatures change how we look at plants and animals

By  •  Latest News

You might have played the game called “animal, vegetable, mineral”. One player thinks of an object or organism and the other players ask questions to try to guess what it …
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